Roasted Chickpeas

26 09 2011

How has your week kicked off? The weather continues to be balmy here in Calgary. Now that the busy summer is over, I have been enjoying trying a new recipe here and there. The other weekend I tried one of Mark Bittman’s recipes for Roasted Chickpeas. I was looking for something simple and healthful to bring to a certain someone’s non-birthday party and I knew an experiment would be okay with this crowd. For his actual recipe and blog click here. I adapted his recipe to my tastes and seasoned with hot smoked paprika and sea salt. Smoked paprika is popular in Spanish foods. It is super flavourful. I picked some up after taking a Spanish cooking class with Tony before our honeymoon to Almeria, Spain a few years back. At the cooking class we made toasted blanched almonds with smoked paprika and sea salt, which were amazing. I figured it would make chickpeas exciting too.

  • 3 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 can, 398ml, drained cooked / canned Chickpeas
  • 1 tsp minced Garlic
  • Fresh cracked Black Pepper
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1 tsp or more Hot (or mild) Smoked Paprika

Pre-heat the oven to 400F. Heat the oil over medium heat in an overproof fry pan/skillet that is large enough for the chickpeas to be in one layer. If you have a pan with a handle that might be sensitive to heat, I have seen chefs wrap tin foil around it. Once the oil is hot, add the chickpeas, garlic, half the salt and some cracked pepper. The garlic and chickpeas will crackle a bit, shake the pan so the chickpeas are coated. Place the pan in the oven. Roast in the oven for 20-30 min (mine took 30 to get a crunchier skin), shaking the pan every 5 min or so. When they’re done, sprinkle with the paprika and the rest of the salt, toss, taste, adjust and serve.

Smoked Paprika Roasted Chickpeas

I found the crispness didn’t last very long, but everyone that tried them said they were good and would be good on a salad too. Tony kept eating them in the car on the way to the party (bad distracted driver).

Eat well, Be well,

Nat





Hungarian Lesco

19 09 2011

How was your weekend? Mine was filled with cooking, eating and visiting. It was nice to spend time with friends and family and have few things to achieve. What I love about this blog is sharing traditional recipes with you, ones that are passed down through the generations. Today Tony and I made Lesco (Lecho in English, pronounced lech-oh). Lecso is a Hungarian pepper stew. I am lucky to have a husband that finds this to be a comfort food like I do. He was on and on about making some for winter, so we headed out to the farmers markets Saturday in search of sweet yellow Hungarian peppers, paprika and onions. Now when I say we made lesco, we made A LOT of lesco.

A sink of peppers and tomatoes

While at yoga T washed and prepped the peppers, 25 pounds of Hungarian peppers and a pound or two of hot banana peppers. I got home and it was straight to work. In two hours we chopped, sautéed and stewed. We kept some aside for dinner and packed the rest up in freezer bags for winter.

T prepping hot peppers (gloves a must for contact wearers 🙂

My mom taught me how to make lesco a couple of years ago, she learned from grandma and developed our family recipe I grew up eating. This was my first attempt on my own, easy peesy, and it tastes just like moms :).

Sauteing Peppers

Here is my family recipe for Lesco (I’ve given you a smaller portion size here):

  • 2 bags sweet Hungarian Peppers (the produce bags you get from the grocery/market), seeded and chopped
  • 5 hot Banana Peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 2 medium or 3 small sweet White Onions, chopped
  • 5 medium Tomatoes or 8 Roma or 1 can Whole Tomatoes
  • 4-5 tbsp Hungarian or Spanish Paprika (sweet, red and full of flavour)
  • 3/4 – 1 c Sour Creme
  • Olive Oil for sautéing
  • 2 tsp Sea Salt

BIG pot of Lesco

Blanche the tomatoes, remove skin, chop. Saute the onion in olive oil until transparent. Add 1-2 tbsp of paprika and 1 tsp salt, mix. Add the tomatoes to the onion mixture, warm through. Set aside. In the meantime or after the onions are done, saute the chopped hot peppers in one pan and the sweet peppers in another large pot in olive oil. That way you can add the hot peppers to the mixture a bit at a time. Saute peppers until al dente. Add tomato-onion mixture to the sweet peppers, mix over low-medium heat. Add small portions of the hot peppers and taste until you have a heat level you like. If you don’t like hot, do add at least one hot pepper, it gives it flavour. Add 2-3 more tbsp of paprika, 1 tsp or more of salt to taste. Stew low-medium heat for 15-20 min. Add the sour creme, stir well.

Lesco Packed up for Winter

Eat fresh with fresh sour dough bread, mmmm. We had ours for dinner and packed the rest up for the freezer.
If you are in Calgary and want Hungarian paprika, I found gorgeous paprika it at the Crossroads Market, at the Hungarian Deli.
What traditional foods bring you comfort?
Eat well, Be well,
Nat




Recipe Share: Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

12 09 2011

I finally did it, I made a pie :). Well, I cheated though. I was over at grandmas the other day and after a tour of the tomato garden, raspberries and talk of slugs eating the soska (sorrel) we started talking pie. She makes pie all year round by making and freezing pie shells, tops included. She’s made round pie top holders out of cardboard and covered with tin foil, smart lady. In the summer she just adds fresh fruit and in the winter adds frozen. She is a bit sugar savvy and doesn’t like to use a lot of sugar although in recent years she started using Splenda…whadda gonna do? Oh well. However, I notice she will always give you the full recipe (sugar and all) so you can adjust it yourself. She knows you need to know and understand the basics before experimenting, so she never filters a recipe before giving it to you.

I have said before I am not a pastry chef, but she felt that I should make a pie with all the wonderful rhubarb I have. She is not happy with her own and can be caught now and then snatching some from my garden…and doing a general inspection of my gardening skills in which she gives me a report the next time I see her (rave reviews the last time :)). So, to facilitate this pie making she sent me home with a frozen shell and top. A boost of confidence, she trusted me with a pie crust!

In a previous post, I told you about the recipe journal I got at my wedding shower, with recipes from all the ladies pasted inside. Well grandma shared Strawberry Rhubarb Pie of course. I love how my friend kept the pin in the paper. So with recipe in hand (and a few other pointers that were left out) I gave it a go on Sunday.

Honestly, I only had to call her once when the pie filling was bubbling over in a couple of spots which I placed little pieces of tin foil to catch the dribble. Here is the recipe and instructions in its entirety and my adjustments:

  • 3 cups chopped Rhubarb, 1/2″ pieces
  • 1 cup sliced Strawberries
  • 3 tbsp Tapioca flour (if using honey, up the tapioca to 4-5 tbsp)
  • 1 1/2 cups Sugar (I used 1/3 cup Honey instead)
  • 1/4 tsp Nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • 1 9″ Pie Shell, with a top
  • 1 tbsp Cornstarch
  • 1 Egg for egg wash or water

Mix the fruit with the tapioca, sugar/honey, nutmeg and salt. Let sit for 20 min. Dust the bottom of the pie crust with the cornstarch. Add the fruit to the pie shell. Brush the edge of the pie shell with an egg wash or water, put the top on, press the edges together lightly with a fork and trim excess (some people do fancy edges, grandmas way is faster and easier). Cut 8-10 openings in the top and brush with egg wash or water. Bake at 375 F for 1 hour or until golden brown on top. Use pieces of tin foil to catch any dripping fruit. Don’t put a pan or big piece of tin foil under the pie or you disrupt the heat.

Well, it turned out pretty good. I learned I need more tapioca with the honey and I could have used a bit more honey. I have green rhubarb so it is a bit more tart. T liked it and that’s all that mattered, ah. Now, to learn to make my own crusts….

What is your favorite fruit pie?

Eat well, Be well,

Nat





Winnipeg, Yum!

6 09 2011

Summer, boy how time flies. I have nothing but outings to share with you these days because I feel like I haven’t been in the kitchen for weeks (well, to experiment and cook up new and wondrous things that is…I have plans though). This past weekend took us to Winnipeg for a lovely wedding. My pal Lenore and her man Jack got hitched at the Hitch’n Post in Grosse Isle, Manitoba. What a great spot and if you knew these two, you’d say the location was perfect. The wedding was outside nestled among the trees, you could hear birds chirping and a friend strummed a guitar as Lenore walked down the aisle. Lovely. Outside, all around and inside on walls and in the rafters were relics from days gone past. From old trucks to chainsaws.

The Happy Couple

L is a very clever-crafty-stylish gal that blogs at Lather.Write.Repeat. If you haven’t already made your way through my links section, do check out her blog and if you are ever in Winnipeg (with car) you might want to pick up a piece of vintage furniture she has freshened up to bring home. Her sense of style landed her a page in Style at Home magazine recently (September issue, at the back, spotlight on Winnipeg), and in it she shares some of her favourite picks in her home town. T and I decided the best way to see Winnipeg is follow the advice of a friend, so we spent a day doing just that. Here is our tour of Winnipeg.

We stayed at the Inn at the Forks, which is near the Forks Market. A public park along the Assiniboine River with restaurants and shops where we met the new bride for tea. You know me and my thoughts on sugar…if I am going to have it make it worth it, like a cupcake. Well I made it worth it with the best Cinnamon bun I have ever had from Tall Grass Prairie Bread Company. It was whole wheat, not that sweet actually, full of cinnamon and no gross icing. It was warm out of the oven. I washed it down with a tea from Human Bean Coffee and Tea Shop. T and I ventured out to hit up three areas of Winnipeg; The Exchange District, Osbourne and Corydon.

Tea Time Treat

I put together a sweet necklace at Silver Lotus jewelry shop. L bought me earrings and T cufflinks from there for our wedding.

T is for Tony

We picked up more sweets at Baked Expectations for dessert (holidays are for indulging right?). I chose the caramel pecan cheesecake, T picked the Key Lime Pie. More on this later. We headed to the Fort Garry Hotel to check it out. We heard from wedding guest Kelly that it was said to be haunted. Darn, didn’t see any ghosts. Before our flight home we settled in for an early dinner at Bonfire Bistro. This was the perfect spot. Ingredients of the season, modern Italian menu, nice glass of wine (I need a cleanse now). I know some of you LOVED that watermelon salad I posted a few weeks ago, here is another version. Try cubed watermelon, shelled edamame beans, cubed cucumber, thinly shaved radish with an avocado creme dressing (or dressing of your choice) and a sprinkle of toasted sesame seeds. I have an avocado creme dressing somewhere…i’ll have to share that one day.

Watermelon Edamame Salad

I have to say, I wish we had more time than the afternoon to see the museums. A new Canadian Museum of Human Rights is being built right by The Forks and I plan on visiting that one day.

We got back to the airport with plenty of time to catch our flight and of course it was delayed, grrr. We had planned on eating our dessert on the plane, but the terminal would have to do. I love the box.

Baked Expectations

Now it is September, the harvest is among us (although I am patiently awaiting the redness of our tomatoes…wait, I see red!!!) and hopefully you are able to enjoy the extended summer if you are in Calgary. We might just get a ‘fall’ this year!

Eat well, Be well,

Nat





Diner Delight

30 08 2011

The Guy F Mark

We were recently in Spokane, Washington for our annual road trip to the Goodguys Rod and Custom Association car show. We had a smaller contingent of folks take the trip this year, but was fun just the same. There were more than 1500 cars at the Spokane fair grounds, including the three we trailer’ed down. Since we were driving around in hot-rods what a great opportunity to check out some diners (like the show Drivers, Diners and Dives). I know, I know, real foodies flinch these days at all the ridiculous food reality shows out there (I’m one of them). However, the benefit to ‘Triple D’ is that we hopped in our cars and checked out a scene we would normally never have known about, and it made our night.

Our buddy Owen tasting Kids Mac & Cheese

We headed to Chaps (check out their website). A very cool and very fitting place owned by two friends. It is a throw back to the 50’s with spiked favourites like Lobster Mac & Cheese and Fish Tacos.

Our '67 Beaumont 'Della' in front of Chaps

A bakery is a part of the story which serves up lots of different pastries and cookies – which my mom bought a box of and I only tried one, boo. Sneaky lady. But the Chocolate Ginger I had was delicious!

Yummy, Chocolate and Ginger

That concluded three of four trips this summer, two of which were road trips. Now we head east to a wedding in Winnipeg, Manitoba….which I am sure I’ll have some lovely things to share cause the gal getting married is one of the loveliest I know.

T & I in front of the Chaps Truck

How has your summer been? Any food exploration? I love hearing from you, thanks for sharing your experiments and which recipes you have tried from the blog. Healthful eating (except for that Chocolate Ginger cookie:)) is important, happy to be on the journey with you.

Eat well, Be well,

Nat





Watermelon, a Treat and Dinner

16 08 2011

August is sneaking by and it is a bit of a frenzy to get as much of the seasons fruit as you can. Nothing says summer like watermelon. As I was cutting up watermelon for another road trip, I thought of all the ways to cut watermelon, everyone has their way. I wash first…never know where it’s been, even organic. I slice the bottom off, so it doesn’t roll and depending on how big it is, cut it in half and slice the rind off, then into chunks. I had quite the production going, chopped the scrap into small pieces and threw into the bucket for the compost (my under the sink Budweiser bucket, nice ;)), containers for the road and what didn’t fit, into a bowl for Tony. How do you slice your watermelon?

I had a fantastic watermelon salad at a great restaurant in Vegas last year. I hadn’t tried making a watermelon salad until a few weeks ago. I found a few in my books and they were all similar. I happen to be at my favourite farmers market, KFM, and at my usual tomato, cucumber and pepper stop, The Cucumber Man, they had fresh bags of arugula, ooooooohhhh. It was then it popped into my head I could make a watermelon salad. Done. I love cooking by the season and what I find at the market. Here’s the recipe, it is so good. Makes enough for two dinner size salads or four side salads.

  • 4 cups of cubed Watermelon, about 2 cm
  • 2 tsp chopped fresh Oregano, fresh from the garden (or use 1 tsp dry)
  • 1/2 small Red Onion, sliced really fine (optional for sattvic)
  • 5 cups of Arugula (at least I think that’s how much was in the bag)
  • 1/4 cup crumbled Feta (I bought a low-fat one from Sylvan Star, it was really good. You can use ricotta or parm as well)
  • Fresh ground Black Pepper
  • 1 tbsp White Wine Vinegar
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • Fresh ground Black Pepper
  • 2-3 tbsp Olive Oil
Whisk the vinegar, salt, pepper and olive oil together for the dressing. Toss the watermelon, oregano and onion into the dressing, careful not to break up the watermelon. You can chill this for a bit before mixing the rest. When you are ready to serve, gently toss the arugula with the dressing and watermelon, add the feta and more fresh cracked pepper. Enjoy.
Eat well, Be well,
Nat




Blueberry Peach Cobbler

10 08 2011

Cobbler Warm from the Oven

Oh boy, this is yummy. I follow a chef/writer Mark Bittman and he posted a recipe for a Blueberry Cobbler the other day. It asked for white flour and 1 cup of sugar, so I of course set out to modify it. I had fresh picked peaches and blueberries from Kelowna and I was ready to experiment. If you want the original recipe, follow the link above, but for the no white sugar version, here you go. I saw no reason on adding white sugar or all that butter to it. I used honey instead and thickened it with a bit of Kuzu, or Japanese Arrowroot.

  • 4 cups Blueberries
  • 4 cups sliced Peaches, skin on
  • 4-8 tbsp Honey (instead of 1 cup of sugar)
  • 1 tbsp Kuzu mixed in 1 tbsp water (or use the appropriate amount of cornstarch for a bit of thickening)
  • 4 tbsp cold Butter (instead of 8 tbsp)
  • 1/4 cup Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1/4 cup Spelt Flour
  • 1/2 tsp Baking Powder (I use wheat & corn free, but double the amount)
  • Pinch Salt
  • 1 Egg
  • 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract (get the good stuff, it’s worth it)
Pre-heat over to 375F. Mix the kuzu water blend with the fruit and 2-4 tbsp honey. If the fruit is in season, it doesn’t need sweetening, the sugar does make the juice thicker though, that’s why I used the kuzu. Use a bit of butter to grease a pie pan or a 8-inch square pan. Add the fruit mixture into the pan.

Warmed up over the Fire

Mix the flour, baking powder and salt together. Cut the butter into small pieces, add to the flour mixture. Using a pastry knife cut the butter into the flour mixture as well as you can. Add 2-6 tbsp of honey, experiment with how sweet you like it, blend with pastry knife. If you have a food processor you can pulse the flour mixture, butter and honey together using it.

Add the egg and vanilla and mix into a thick batter using a fork. I made this twice and the second time I added a wee bit too much flour so I added a tbsp of water and mixed it in. This dough is not rocket science. Spoon the batter onto the fruit, I agree with Mark to not spread it out, but I gave it a little push around. Both attempts were good at 45-50 min in the middle rack, but check to make sure it doesn’t get to golden. I baked the first one in my brothers oven and it got a bit over done. Let cool and set for 10 minutes or so. At my brother’s house I warmed it up over the fire after dinner!

Cobbler served with Vanilla Frozen Yogurt

Serve with frozen vanilla yogurt like we did. Best compliment I got “Nat, this tastes clean, so good”. Just what I was going for, the fruit sang.
Eat well, Be well,
Nat




Salmonella, Cargill, Yikes

6 08 2011

Concerned about the massive ground turkey recall by Cargill? Not sure we need to worry about this specific recall in Canada, but we should worry about salmonella. I spent a little bit of time this morning educating myself on what was going on and what I could learn about salmonella. Happy Saturday to me :). I have my opinions. If you have been trying to keep up with the story, I have posted a few things below that you might want to check out:

  • Short video summarizing the issue and how to protect yourself from salmonella by Democracy Now. I appreciate their short look at some of the root causes. Recommend.
  • Maryn McKenna’s Superbug blog post on the fact that distributing salmonella is not illegal. Very interesting read.
  • Short article from the law office Marler Clark, posted to their blog, they represent people who have been infected withfoodborne illnesses. Lots of other posts on the history of these infections and other lawsuits they have been involved in. They have a very clear message for Cargill, ‘Start Testing and We Won’t Sue You’.
  • Huffington Post article on the complexity of food safety in the 21st century and how government cutbacks will impact it.
  • Food Safety News blog post on how the USDA’s salmonella policy is failing.
  • A fantastic PowerPoint of the history, epidemiology and molecular biology of salmonella (downloaded PowerPoint). History of Salmonella
  • Article from ‘Meathead’ on Huffington Post. He does have points about veggies and certainly schools people on how to make the food safe. He misses the point on why we are in this mess in the first place though.

I went to Cargill’s American web site to read the recall for myself. It is a voluntary, so nice of them, to pull their products from the shelf because of the ‘possible contamination’ dating back to Feb. They make sure to remind us that Salmonella is very common, found in all food and that in general, bacteria is found everywhere. They point out that proper handling is key. Ah shucks, we’re so lucky to have producers like this, reminding us how it is our fault if we get sick.

Don’t get me wrong, I know salmonella is very common, there are many strains but not all cause illness. We do see increased outbreaks due to the MASSIVE PRODUCTION of food. So much of it is from our handling of animals and feed and how we dispose of the mass waste in these production lines, passing it on to veggies and fruit (salmonella is NOT naturally occurring in fruit and vegetables). Safe handling of food is key, but it certainly convinces me to continue thinking about how we produce our food and what food to consume. As well, we can’t ignore how systems like government and agriculture/farming are inter-related. There is great concern that the trillion-dollar spending cuts in the US are going to further impact policy keepers like the USDA. This is a real concern, although, where are the ethics of the people producing the food? Profits win the game between doing right and making money, unfortunately. How about our insatiable appetite for animal products?

For me these news stories are about looking beyond the headlines and asking questions that start to reveal the cause of the issue. This inquiry creates more questions, but it helps to connect the issue to better answers than ‘wash your hands’ and ‘cook meat well’.

Eat well, Be well,

Nat





Roadtrip: Kelowna and Vernon

1 08 2011

Enjoying the summer? We have had a busy agenda so far. This past week we made it out to the Okanagan in BC for our second annual trip to stay and visit friends in both Kelowna and Vernon. Can you call something twice done annual? Sure. This year we stayed at the Palliser Lodge in Golden, BC on the way out so our drive wasn’t as long and we didn’t have to leave early in the morning from Calgary. It was lovely, quiet and just what the doctor ordered. I was fighting a summer cold, but I warded it off with Vitamin C, Echinacea and homeopathic Coryzalia (besides my pillow and lots of rest). I was not risking a cold for wine tasting and buying. 😉

Our first stop was, well, uh, um, a winery. I changed into a summery frock in the Orchard Mall parking lot and we headed to Summerhill Winery for a light lunch and glass of wine before meeting up with our friends. Priorities eh, kidding, it was a scheduling opportunity. At Summerhill we had a build-it-yourself cheese platter. The one thing that I was in love with were the Truffled Wild Mushrooms. How easy would this be to make. Saute various wild mushrooms (chanterelle, morels, porcini etc) in some light olive oil and a bit of truffle oil. Yum. I’m gonna remember this one to try one day. We picked up wine after lunch and headed to Cedar Creek, their Merlot is a favourite of ours. It was all business, we know what we want, taste the newest press, choose, buy.

Cheese, Fresh Bread and Truffled Mushrooms

On the way home from BC we always pick up fruit. This is where my rants about organic versus local get stirred up in my head. We bought as much organic as we could, but it is not as prevalent and usually only found at the farmers markets that we missed. You can get pesticide free fruit, not necessarily certified organic, this is a good alternative though. It is expensive for farmers to certify when they can’t control the farms around them spraying. Anyhow, we did our best and picked up a box of apricots for grandma (she likes to make jam), a box of peaches (Tony’s favourite), a small box of cherries (they had a late harvest this year and we ate half of the box on the way home) and a big box of blueberries. What to do with all this fruit? Eat some fresh, bake some and freeze the rest!

I am not a jam maker, per se. I like to make fresh jams without sugar and they don’t preserve for long, so I make small batches of freezer jams and use frozen fruit through the winter to make new batches and other things. I bought the blueberries mostly for my green smoothies. Green Smoothie = fruit + green leafy vegetables, i.e. spinach, kale, swiss chard, beet greens etc. It’s the first thing I eat every morning. 1.5 cups of fruit to 3 cups of veg. Blend it up well with 2 cups of water. Good for the body, mind and soul (and digestive track :)). Drink this before a healthy breakfast, good to go.

Banana, Blueberries with Spinach and Swiss Chard from my garden

Freezing fruit for winter is easy. I like to wash it all off with a veggie wash. I fill the sink, immerse the fruit for a few minutes and then rinse. Let it dry a bit. Place berries on a cookie tray to dry, use a dish towel or paper towel if you’d like. Cut fruit like peaches into slices and place on tray. Freezing like this doesn’t take long. When frozen throw fruit into a freezer bag, pressing as much air out as possible. If you have an airtight bagging system, use that of course. I don’t, but might invest in one. Enjoy fruit all winter long.

What is your favourite summer fruit or fruit recipe?

Eat well, Be well,

Nat





A Foodie Read: Animal Vegetable Miracle

25 07 2011

If you are at all interested in living in a sustainable way, love local food and want to be apart of the growing slow food movement, read this book: Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. You don’t have to try to attain 100% of what she does in the book, but reading it will inspire you to think differently about the food you put on your families table (and in your mouth). Kingsolver is a well known novelist (The Bean Trees and The Poisonwood Bible), I haven’t read anything else of hers but having read this book, I am sure her fiction is a wonderful experience to read. Animal Vegetable Miracle is a non-fiction account of her family’s experience to grow their own food and source everything locally for one year. The book has three authors, Barbara is the main one, and she actually has a graduate degree in ecology and evolutionary biology. Her husband Steven is an environmental studies professor and her daughter Camille is one a very inspirational young adult.

The book tracks the growing season, from planning to seeding to growing to harvest to planning again. She deals with vegetables, chickens (in which her younger daughter creates an egg enterprise… I so want chickens), meat and cheese. For those of us that do not eat meat, I have to say her explanation of animals is incredibly respectful. She is anti processed food, supports farm raised everything and gives you lots to think about when eating raspberries in the dead of winter;

“We’re raising our children on the definition of promiscuity if we feed them a casual, indiscriminate mingling of foods from every season plucked from the supermarket, ignoring how our sustenance is cheapened by wholesale desires.”

The book is full of recipes, meal plans and has a wonderful website where you can also get them from, click here.

We do okay in the arena of slow food, we’re not perfect, that’s for sure, but conscious of our choices and more so every day. I am very happy to pick fresh lettuce from the garden on my way into the house after work, but come winter, it is tough in Alberta. The farmers markets keep us going and it is amazing what they are growing in hot houses these days. I encourage you to pay closer attention to the seasonality of your food. Watermelon in the dead of winter, not so kind. The watermelon we had recently, very yummy and it didn’t travel that far to get to us (although, it certainly didn’t grow up on the prairies).

What are you reading this summer? Maybe this is the book for you.

Be well, Eat well,

Nat